Angry Army Wife or: Life After the Military

Originally I had planned to make this blog about the things that have happened to my husband and me. That quickly changed as I found out the problems with the military cover a much larger range than what we’ve experienced, like don’t ask don’t tell hasn’t been repealed, sexist culture, rape culture, homophobic culture, etc.

Contrary to popular opinion I do love my husband, I respect him, and am proud of him, and what he does. I do not hate soldiers, several of my family members have been in the army for 20+ years, and even more have been in the navy. I just think many things in the army need to change, and that word needs to get out about what’s going on.

"Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you’ll be criticized anyway. You’ll be damned if you do, and damned if you don’t."-Eleanor Roosevelt

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  1. thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Last night, veteran foreign correspondent and two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anthony Shadid of the New York Times died of an apparent asthma attack while on assignment inside Syria. The genuine outpouring of grief on social media has been a testament to how much of an inspiration and a model for journalism and reporting he has been to so many, myself included. This is a great loss. Read his work for the NYT here.
Rolling Stone got its hands on a draft copy of LTC Daniel Davis’s report, “Dereliction of Duty II: Senior Military Leaders’ Loss of Integrity Wounds Afghan War Effort.”
Civilian contractor deaths outnumbered US military deaths in Afghanistan this year. The risks to them highlight the minimal attention paid to them in casualty counts and the actions of private contracting companies toward their employees.
The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan released its assessment report on civilians in the Afghan conflict for 2011.
NPR interviewed former Army Sgt Kayla Williams about the status of women in the military and she had very wise things to say.
On a similar note, I have a deconstruction of Rick Santorum’s position on women in the military up over at The Risky Shift.
The Joint IED Defense Organization released a Counter-IED Strategic Plan, which essentially paints a grim and expensive picture of the future of the fight against these weapons.
An NPR discussion on Syria asks if it’s time for military intervention.
Obama’s 2013 budget request calls for defense cuts, which Lieberman called a risk to national security.
Defense Sec’y Leon Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Dempsey testified in front of the House Armed Services Committee Wednesday and were grilled over the budget (particularly base closures and nuclear cuts). Chairman of HASC, Buck McKeon, called the Obama defense cuts a “strategy founded on hope.”
The Tunisian defense minister looks to foster a military relationship with the US, calling for US support after a Wednesday meeting of a joint Tunisian-American military commission.
Bahrain and Libya both marked the anniversaries of the births of their protest movements and revolutions (February 14th and February 17th, respectively).
The Pakistani military has rejected Human Rights Watch’s criticisms of a judicial commission set up to investigate the death of journalist Saleem Shahzad, calling HRW’s statements ‘derogatory, biased and contradictory.”
Photo: Rangers from 1st Bn, 75th Ranger Regiment in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan await extraction by a CH-47. US Army Pfc. Pedro Almodovar. Via the US Army Flickr.

    thepoliticalnotebook:

    This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

    Photo: Rangers from 1st Bn, 75th Ranger Regiment in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan await extraction by a CH-47. US Army Pfc. Pedro Almodovar. Via the US Army Flickr.

     
     
  2. "It is my opinion that the combat exclusion policy actually increases the risk of sexual harassment by making it clear to infantry troops that female personnel are not considered full soldiers. It institutionalizes women’s status as second-class citizens within the military."
    — Former Army Sergeant Kayla Williams dropped a lot of wisdom in an NPR interview earlier this week. You should go read/listen to what she had to say. (via thepoliticalnotebook)
     
     
  3. Do you know of anywhere that I could possibly find statistics or info on marital fidelity during deployment? Some people I've talked to seem to think (or pretend) that this is only a new thing since women joined the military, and it's annoying.
    asked by Anonymous
    answer:

    I honestly haven’t been able to find much about it on the internet as it’s usually divorce rates, not fidelity or infidelity rates and they’d much rather give an answer which boils down to men can’t control their sexual urges especially under stress so of course infidelity happens. They don’t tell you that the military has provided war after war, until the first gulf war, prostitutes for the men, and that infidelity is simply not a new problem.

    As far as it being service woman’s fault that is simply untrue. The American military have actively provided prostitutes to it’s service men during war. Until the first gulf war the military actively provided prostitutes for servicemen. The reason the stopped was because the US became concerned that it would hurt their relationships with the countries in which they were housing their troops. (Hunter, Honor Betrayed, pg 65)

    In World War I STDs were the second most common illness amongst troops; second only to the flu. The US government spent fifty million dollars treating STDs in World War 1. (Hunter, pg 68)

    Officers would make a point to tell servicemen when their PCOD (pussy cut off date) was so they could receive 30 days of treatment for their STD’s. Officers recived better care for their STDs and were diagnosed with “nonspecific urethritis” so their wives wouldn’t know. (Hunter, pg 68)

    I could go on, but I think everyone gets the idea. Besides saying it’s the woman’s fault for a married man’s infidelity is saying that men can’t control themselves, and that’s saying that men are lesser beings now isn’t it.

     
     
  4. militaryheroes:

Photo by Maya Alleruzzo

    militaryheroes:

    Photo by Maya Alleruzzo

     
     
  5. "Dying? I reject that number completely, that people die in America because of lack of health insurance. People die in America because people die in America. And people make poor decisions with respect to their health and their healthcare. And they don’t go to the emergency room or they don’t go to the doctor when they need to."
    — 

    Rick Santorum

    A student, cited a 2009 Harvard University study, saying he didn’t “think God appreciates the fact that we have 50 to 100,000 uninsured Americans dying due to a lack of healthcare every year. - The Raw Story

    (via brooklynmutt)

    Wow. Heartless.

    -Jess

    (via stfuconservatives)

    My husband’s a veteran. He was over in Iraq. We can’t afford health care. He fought your war. Was he lazy Rick Santorum?

    (via laurenmisfortune)

     
     
  6. thefamilyrecords:

    Petty Officer 2nd Class Marissa Gaeta won a raffle on the dock landing ship Oak Hill to be the first to kiss a loved one on its return to Virginia Beach. Petty Officer 3rd Class Citlalic Snell was waiting.

    First same-sex homecoming kiss in the navy! Who knew! Posting this partially because it’s just an awesome historic moment, and partially because I have a small innocent different-sex crush on the shorter one. - Wesley

     
     
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  8. matilda3663:

    The True Cost of U.S. Military Equipment

    aheram:

    The True Cost of U.S. Military Equipment

    And then there are the true costs of war.

     
     
  9. homohelper:




Check out the homohelp store! 25% of all proceeds are donated to GLSEN!

    homohelper:

    Check out the homohelp store! 25% of all proceeds are donated to GLSEN!

     
     
  10. (Source: athletic-beauty)